Hungarian Goulash made in the Dutch Oven

Hungarian Goulash made in the Dutch Oven

Finally it’s weekend! Time to sit back and relax. While you gently wake-up there’s nothing better than starting a fire with a cup of coffee by hand. The dutch oven will be your friend. Slowly making a stew. Hungarian Goulash for instance. While sitting in a cozy chair guarding your fire you’ll notice some heavenly flavours filling your guarden while the city is waking up! A couple of hours later you’ll be serving a delicious stew made in a session you won’t forget! You recognize this scene? If so, welcome you dutch oven lover! If not! Come on! You’re missing a lot of fun!

Jump to Recipe

Disclosure: "This post makes use of Affiliate links. All shared opinions are honest and my own."

Hungarian Goulash

Or to be completely correct I should say: “Pörkölt”. The traditional Hungarian national dish: “Goulash” actually is a meal soup consisting mostly out of onions, bell peppers and meat. Mostly beef is used for this soup, but just like many stews there are a lot of delightful spin offs. Some using lamb, some pork and even fish occurs. When cooked through and bonded this meal soup turns into a legendary stew named “Pörkölt”. Each family has their own secret recipe and every kid is bragging about their moms being the best! Well, I’ve made my own twist. And guess what my kids are doing right now?

Hungarian goulash

Stout beer

But I won’t keep my personal ingredient a secret. Being from Belgium where beer has an important role both in how our society and food culture has been built. So it might not be the biggest surprise I was tempted to add some beer to this recipe. Based upon the flemish stew where the beer is bringing the punch to the meal. I’ve used this irish coffee stout with hints of chocolate. Both are flavours who empower the taste of bell peppers when used in the right concentration! You won’t actually taste the beer but the flavor of this Hongarian Goulash recipe will be somewhat deeper and complete! Just give it a try.

Are you a big fan of making stews in your dutch oven? Tell me what’s your go to stew recipe? I’m looking for some more awesome stew recipes and probably in your country there’s a spectacular meal I need to try?
Hungarian Goulash with stout beer
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
4 hrs
Total Time
4 hrs 15 mins
 

I love the smell of stew in the morning! Getting up and starting to prepare your meal! Walking outdoors with a coffee in your hand heating up beside the fireplace. The smell of Goulash is filling the garden while the sun slowly awakes and the city comes to live! What a wonderful experience! Start your fires! It's time to enjoy!

Course: Main Course, Stew
Cuisine: European, Hongarian
Keyword: Cooking on fire, cooking with beer, Dutch oven, Goulash, Hongarian, stew
Servings: 4 People
Ingredients
  • 1 kg Beef Shoulder parts
  • 3 onions
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 3 red bell peppers
  • 2 yellow bell peppers
  • 2 carrrots
  • 70 gr concentrated tomato paste
  • 2 tbsp mild Paprika powder
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds optional
  • 1 Bouquet garni
  • 5 dl Beef stock
  • 2.5 dl Stout beer
  • 2 Tbsp Wheat flour
  • 2 tbsp tomato ketchup
  • chili powder optional
  • pork fat or olive oil
  • fresh parsley at taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • sea salt at taste
Tools
  • Dutch oven
  • Baking pan
  • Big spoon
Instructions
Preparations
  1. Cut the beef shoulder in pieces from about 5 cm. and cut the onion.

  2. Remove the skin and green heart before crushing the garlic. 

  3. Remove the stems and seeds from the bell peppers and slice them.

  4. Cut the carrot in small pieces. 

  5. Thoroughly rinse the parsley and chop it. 

Dutch Oven time
  1. Prepare your BBQ for a direct session on medium heat (+-200°C/400°F). When using a kamado you might need the accessory rack to hang your dutch oven.

  2. Preheat the dutch oven before adding the Pork fat (or olive oil). Brown the meat in batches otherwise you'll be cooking them and never get a nice colour (and flavor). 

  3. Lower the heat of your bbq when all of the meat is browned and remove the meat. Toss in the spices and let simmer for a couple of minutes to release their fragrants and flavors. Add the onions and garlic to cook until translucent. 

  4. Add half of the bell peppers and braise them with the other ingredients. Add the meat again and sprinkle with 2 Tbsp wheat flower. Stir thoroughly to prevent the flower from forming clumps. 

  5. Add the Tomato puree and cook for a couple of minutes before adding a sip of the broth to deglace the dutch oven. 

  6. Add the rest of the beef stock and the stout beer. Make sure the meat is covered with the liquids.  

  7. Add the bouquet garni to the stew and let gently simmer over a medium heat fire for a couple of hours (3 to 4). The meat needs to be soft and tender, nearly falling apart. 

  8. Stir every once a while. When you notice to much liquid got lost you can add some more stock or beer or just put the lid on top of the dutch oven. 

  9. About 15 minutes before the end of your session you can add the carrots and remaining bell peppers. Let simmer for a while until the carrots are done. 

  10. Remove the bouquet garni, add 2 Tbsp of ketchup and give it at taste. Add some more ingredients at your own desire (salt, pepper, chili, ...) I've added juice of a half lemon for some extra punch and to accentuate the other flavors. 

Sprinkle some freshly chopped parsley on top and serve with rice or mashed potatoes! Have a tasteful meal!
Recipe Notes

Hint: a stew often tastes better the day after you've cooked the meal!



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


Inline
Inline